Inaction

Inaction

After watching many interviews and reading several reports, it is clear that illegal actions were taken by individuals during the 2020 election; there is video evidence of people breaking the law. It is untenable, in my opinion, to overturn the 2020 results, but it is essential to fix the identified problems. Legislatures can stop drop boxes and other problematic processes; it can indict elected or appointed officials who ignore the law. Oversight can be improved. Invite both sides, but ensure one vote per eligible voter. Create an ironclad audit trail and leave technology out of it. It is not rocket science.

But that is not the point of this post.

When laws are broken, actions need to occur. We don’t need to form committees and get consensus. People need to be arrested and charged; adjudication must be quick. If it is not, as is the case with many of these election issues, why not? The people in charge need to stand in front of the people and explain why the video evidence is wrong. Why the allegations are untrue or do not warrant further investigation. Whether its True The Vote’s (TTV) surveillance footage or the Hunter Biden laptop, the people must see the process working or be told why it is failing.

Homeless encampments are popping up all over this country, these are in violation of current law. It should not be allowed. Cities can house them in temporary tents with rules and oversight. If necessary, bring in the army to set them up. The army knows how to house people and local law enforcement can police the area. People need to know a rule of law exists. If people break the law, either white or blue collar crime, the citizens must be sure the law will be enforced. The Southern Border is another egregious example.

Alacrity is lost when it comes to many things and adjudication ranks near the top. It can take months, if not years, for something to come to trial. If the government is involved, throw decades into the mix. It is absurd. The Judicial Branch practices are archaic and the law is too complicated, but it doesn’t have to be this way. Society is watching as current laws are ignored and it wonders which laws will be next. What law will the executive branch, or law enforcement, decide is too costly or “unfair” to enforce? Laws are made by the Legislature and should be enforced. If the law is too costly or ambiguous, it should be rewritten to make it enforceable or funded at a level to adhere to current law. Enforcement of law should not be arbitrary.

The Executive Branch, and its associates, don’t get to cherry pick what laws it enforces.

Housing rule breakers is expensive but not nearly as expensive as the loss of the rule of law. It emboldens criminals, crushes morale, and damages citizens’ perception of law enforcement. The focus must be on providing a safe environment for the very large percentage of the population who would never consider a capital crime and to ensure swift adjudication of any that do. As the news reminds us daily, breaking the law lacks consequences. The perceived punishment does not appear to act as a deterrent. Society must insist the “piper be paid”.

As laws are ignored, other rules are established under the auspices of current law. Look at the disinformation agency. Why is this new agency being created when other current policy and law are being ignored? I appreciate multi tasking, but fixing what is currently broken before creating new agencies seems a better tactic.

When elected and appointed officials refuse to enforce laws, the population suffers. When these same elected officials get reelected, the avoidance of more laws occur. The cycle not only continues, it gets worse.

We need enforcement action, not avoidance.

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Categorized as Policy

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